National Consultant to undertake Intersectional Gender Analysis in Northeast Nigeria



Advertised on behalf of :

Location : Home Based with travel to Borno, Adamawa, and Yobe States, NIGERIA
Application Deadline :27-May-22 (Midnight New York, USA)
Time left :0d 5h 38m
Type of Contract :Individual Contract
Post Level :National Consultant
Languages Required :
English  
Duration of Initial Contract :45 Working days over a 3 month period


UNDP is committed to achieving workforce diversity in terms of gender, nationality and culture. Individuals from minority groups, indigenous groups and persons with disabilities are equally encouraged to apply. All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.

UNDP does not tolerate sexual exploitation and abuse, any kind of harassment, including sexual harassment, and discrimination. All selected candidates will, therefore, undergo rigorous reference and background checks.


Background

UN Women, grounded in the vision of equality enshrined in the Charter of the United Nations, works for the elimination of discrimination against women and girls; the empowerment of women; and the achievement of equality between women and men as partners and beneficiaries of development, human rights, humanitarian action and peace and security. UN Women’s engagement in humanitarian action and peacebuilding is to ensure consistency and sustainability in addressing gender equality concerns across the humanitarian-development continuum. The importance of gender integration in humanitarian response,  post-conflict reconstruction and peacebuilding is embedded in the United Nations Security Council Resolution 1325, the ground-breaking resolution that acknowledges the impact of conflict on women, and also recognizing the importance of utilizing women’s contribution and active participation in conflict prevention, peace-building and relief and recovery efforts.

UN Women has a strong mandate on gender in emergencies and ensures that humanitarian response, recovery, development and peacebuilding efforts adequately address the needs and rights of crisis affected population with strong gender focus. UN Women works with other UN agencies, INGO, local actors to support inter-agencies coordination effort to ensure gender in emergency programming. UN Women in 2018 with technical support from a GenCap Senior Gender Advisor established a Northeast Nigeria Gender Technical Team (GTT) working group co-chaired by UN OCHA and UN Women to provide technical support gender efforts in the Northeast humanitarian response. The GTT co-chaired by UN Women and UN OCHA seeks to engage the service of a consultant/consultancy firm to undertake a Intersectoral Gender Analysis across Borno, Adamawa and Yobe States.

Background/Context

The protracted conflict in Northeast Nigeria between Boko Haram and the Nigerian State and its Armed Forces has internally displaced an estimated 2.9 million people across Borno, and Adamawa and Yobe (BAY) States while over 684,000 have become IDPs in Cameroon, Chad and Niger and 304,000 refugees in the four countries[1][2]. In April 2021 the crisis reached a new level of escalation resulting from a significant increase in brutal attacks conducted by the armed insurgents on several LGAs that were previously experiencing relative safety both in Yobe and Borno States. According to available statistics, about 300,000 of the current IDPs in Borno, Yobe and Adamawa were displaced by the recent attacks in 2021, with most of them (80%) being women and children, who have experienced multiple displacement. Cumulatively, the conflict has killed an estimated total of 35,000 people and displaced over 2.4 million persons. The humanitarian crisis has consequently deteriorated further, relative to 2020, with the current situation being characterized by extreme levels of food insecurity, rising violence and insecurity, heightened protection risks, and the loss of livelihood opportunities, especially for women and girls. Compounding the impact of the conflict, is the emergence of COVID-19 pandemic with its associate impact that created socio-economic and health stresses. In addition, severe climate variability continues to negatively affect agricultural production, the main livelihood activity of the population in the BAY states, through reduced farm yields, while insecurity has significantly constrained their access to farmlands. Beside Government response strategies such as relocation/resettlement of IDPs from the camps to their original communities has been reversed with increased attacks by the NSAG in the areas of return which has made many of those who had returned to such communities to flee back into host communities within the state and in the neighboring states.

Gender Dimension of the conflict

Pre-crisis, inequality between men and women in Nigeria existed historically and culturally and was very much prevalent in Northeast Nigeria. Women have been either denied access to or granted unequal access to economic opportunities, power, status and privileges in society including limited mobility. The region’s religious and cultural norms, codified in law, have defined women’s status through marriage and childbearing and largely confined them to a domestic role. Although women and girls are the most vulnerable, boys and men are equally vulnerable. From the onset, the insurgency has had a particularly gendered nature: Out of the total IDP population, 54% are women and girls[3]. Many of them have been displaced and continue to be at disproportionate risk of gender-based violence (GBV), including domestic violence, forced/child marriage, and exploitation and trafficking.  Men and boys are mostly targeted for recruitment by Non-State Armed Groups (NSAG) and are at higher risk of being killed and arbitrarily detained[4]. GBV including sexual violence as well as forced and child marriages continue to be reported and are attributed to the conflict, insecurity and poor living conditions in IDP camps and informal settlements. Girls are particularly at risk of child marriage, sexual exploitation, abuse and neglect. The differential risks have left women and girls increasingly engaged in economic activities and decision-making and provider roles[5], which in turn has resulted in an increased burden and vulnerability, as well as altering intra-household dynamics. Men, if they are present, can no longer perform their traditional provider roles, mostly due to lack of access to pastureland. Breakdown of livelihoods, restriction of movement, and insecurity have resulted in an increase in negative coping mechanisms such as survival sex, and child marriage[6].

The operational context of the Northeast is continuously evolving. New displacement in Yobe state and some part of Borno state as well as the relocation of population to communities in Borno state are expected to correspond to increased rate of exploitation and abuse, further worsened by negative coping strategies linked to COVID-19 recovery. Women and girls who have been formerly associated with Boko Haram may have endured rape, sexual abuse or forced marriage and often face high levels of stigmatizations yet received limited psychosocial support in most instances. Stigmatization can also contribute to economic marginalization’s, making it difficult for survivors to rebuild their livelihood and reintegrate fully into community. Furthermore, it is estimated that recovery from COVID-19 pandemic will have multi-layered economic impacts on women that will reduce households’ income and their ability to cover their needs. In the host communities, especially those without appropriate services to hand, women and girls are at heightened risk of GBV including transactional sex to secure funds to support themselves and their families.

 

Gender Inequality can constrain the agency of the most vulnerable, where opportunities are denied making choices, use the skills they have or to acquire new skills, knowledge, and confidence to build assets and increase the return to assets. Inarguably, gender inequality is a consistent feature of vulnerability that interacts with and deepens other forms of inequality created by the conflict in Northeast Nigeria. This means that beyond providing lifesaving humanitarian assistance and increasing opportunities for affected populations to participate, humanitarian and recovery interventions should  seek to address the specific obstacles to participation that the most vulnerable populations face and how gender and other characteristics, such as age, disability, etc. play in to this as the intersectionality of “the most vulnerable” as well as providing the appropriate, equitable humanitarian assistance that people need for (a possible) transition to peace and development. It is for this reason that Intersectional Gender Analysis for the Humanitarian Operation in Borno, Yola and Adamawa States in North East Nigeria is to be undertaken. The assessment will give strong emphasis on the understanding of how the Nigeria Humanitarian Operation can deliver gender responsive humanitarian assistance by considering intersectional dimensions and structural factors that hinder IDPs, returnees and host communities from accessing humanitarian assistance and participating in the operation. In order to achieve this the analysis will be an Intersectional Gender Analysis (IGA), focusing on the distribution of social and humanitarian benefits across social groups and categories but also the structural factors that cause and sustain exclusion and marginalization of vulnerable groups.

 

Main Objective

The main objective of the Intersectional Gender Analysis is to understand the unique vulnerabilities, needs, capacities and coping strategies of IDPs, refugees and returnees (women, girls, boys and men) and host communities in the conflict affected states of Borno, Yobe, and Adamawa in North East Nigeria; and to formulate recommendations for action for the different humanitarian response sectors[7]. The IGA will seek to further understand gender-related immediate and comparable impact of the conflict in North East Nigeria to women and men, to some extent girls and boys, and how they respond and interact to the crisis. The analysis will inform current and future humanitarian programming and advocacy and inform the wider humanitarian response.

Data collected will be based on variables, context and driving forces that affect gender equality and social norms in the three states, noting how they affect women and girls in comparison to men and boys. Disability, age and gender will be among the dependent variables considered in the  analysis. The analysis will inform the humanitarian operation in terms of approaches and adjustments to the planned activities across the sectors to minimize the economic, social, environmental dimensions and structural factors that hinder women and girls and other vulnerable groups from participating in the humanitarian and development assistance processes, achieving positive changes in their lives. The analysis will also inform the policies and programs of humanitarian actors and partners, and shape advocacy direction on existing policies and inform the humanitarian-development nexus response more broadly.

 

[1] UNHCR 2021. Available at www.unhcr.org/nigeria-emergency.html    

[2] IOM DTM, Displacement Report 31, February 2020

[3] IOM DTM, Displacement Report 31, February 2020

[4] OCHA, “Humanitarian Response Strategy 2019–2021” (2019).

[5] Anusanthee Pillay, “Harnessing Gender Transformative Opportunities within Humanitarian Crises”, ACCORD (2018).

[6] CARE, “CARE Rapid Gender and GBV Assessment Borno State.” (2018).

[7] CCCM-Shelter & NFI, Early Recovery and Livelihoods, Education, Health, Food Security, Nutrition, Protection (incl. Child Protection,

  Gender Based Violence), Mine Action SWG, WASH (Water, Sanitation and Hygiene), etc.


Duties and Responsibilities

Duties and Responsibilities

The Intersectional Gender Analysis assessment will be conducted under the overall supervision and close cooperation with the GTT co-chairs UN Women (represented by Lilian Ngusuur Unaegbu) and OCHA  (represented by Zainab Murtala) and with the technical support of the Senior GenCap Advisor. It is expected that the qualifying Consultant(s) will commence the 45 paid work days on 15th of June 2022, and complete by 30th of August 2022. Timelines for the expected outputs will be agreed upon by the GTT and the consultant team.

The consultant/firm will be responsible for the following specific tasks:

1. Understand the gender differences (needs, interests, capacities, roles, relations, risks, vulnerabilities) amongst women, girls, boys and men and how they are affected by the conflict situation in North East Nigeria. The analysis should seek to understand how these differences have changed since the conflict began, by:

  • Identifying different gendered needs and interests, risks, vulnerabilities, and capacities.
  • Better understanding the context and identifying opportunities for women’s empowerment, particularly in increasing their meaningful participation;
  • Identifying and understanding challenges that IDPs, refugees and returnees face and how they cope;
  • Understanding power dynamics at the household and community level.

2. Assess barriers, root causes and discriminating social norms that perpetuate gender inequality and social exclusion in the context of the Nigeria Humanitarian Operation in each state (Borno,  Adamawa and Yobe States).

3. Assess and identify livelihood options/preference identified by women and men that consider fair division of labour and access to and control over income generated.

4. Assess social cohesion and division, in terms of social groups (i.e. age, disability), IDPs, host communities and returnees taking into account a gender perspective.

5. Identify capacities and the current service delivery of duty bearers (Government, UN agencies, international and national NGOs, and CSOs) in responding to the needs of the affected women, girls, boys and men in providing humanitarian services

6. Based on the above, present potential strategies, solutions and actions (individual, community and program based) that can be employed for gender-responsive humanitarian response across the sectors in line with the IASC[1] Policy on Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women and Girls in Humanitarian Action..

Key Areas to Explore:

In order to achieve the objectives above, the following areas will be explored but not limited to:

  • Risk and vulnerabilities by different groups – how do they overlap or differ?
  • Roles of women, youth (male and female), people with disabilities and earning incomes for the household.
  • Access/control over resources and livelihood decision making
  • Community/individual strategies and solutions to issues pertaining to gender (women, men, boys, girls and people with disabilities) and livelihoods
  • Violence and risk prevention and mitigation measures for incorporation into program design for safety across different groups.
  • Which actors should be engaged – other humanitarian agencies, national/ local organizations, duty bearers (government) – to strengthen community-based mitigation strategies and create an enabling environment?
  • How is inclusiveness of people with disabilities, youth and women being exercised or overlooked?
  • What informal and formal community organisations exist and how inclusive these are of women and women’s needs and opportunities
  • What institutions and opportunities are there for an inclusive humanitarian response?
  • What kind of violence are common in the area and what protection mechanisms are available?
  • What kind of stereotypes and negative social norms are among IDP and host communities that hinder a gender-equal, inclusive environment?
  • What health related problems are women facing due to the existing gender gaps/biases/norms
  • What tools can be used to scale up the best practices in addressing the needs of children, youth and women in humanitarain response.
  • What strategies can be used in addressing the needs of gender both at individual, HHs, and community level.
  • What are the specific constraints and opportunities of women related to accessing services?
  • What are the barriers and opportunities for women participation in leadership and decision making structures?

Methodology

The researcher/research team/consultant is expected to use a mixed methods (quantitative and qualitative) approach for carrying out the Intersectional Gender Analysis. The research process will include  desk  review, of qualitative and quantitative relevant data in relation to the gendered impact of the Northeast crises, in-depth interviews with UN agencies and humanitarian actors (International National and local)focus groups, and household survey with affected populations (IDPs and host communities and returnees). The researcher/research team will develop and propose the methodology and techniques to conduct the field work (subject to accessibility), proposing a sampling method, questionnaire and selection criteria for the participants, questions for the focus group discussions, household survey and key informant interviews. The methodology will be reviewed and approved by the Gender Technical Team (GTT), Sector coordinators. The research process be designed with necessary ethical consideration with emphasis on the safety of respondents while collecting  top-line information that will fulfill the objectives of the analysis. Equally important, the methodology should be participatory as well as a mapping of potential (women’s rights or led) groups to partner with.  All necessary data quality control measures will be put in place during the field work, ensuring data protection during collection, storage, transfer, analysis, and reporting.

Primary Data Collection

Primary data collection will utilise focus group discussion (FGDs), key informant interviews and quantitative surveys. Tools should include (i) A quantitative (closed-ended) questionnaire for the survey component of the intersectional Gender Analysis; and most importantly (ii) Separate qualitative (open-ended) guides for key Informant Interview and Focus group discussion in order to best capture the nuances of the above mentioned variables, in a specific context.

Secondary Data Collection

Desk review and pre-existing information on North East Nigeria situational and intersectional gender and gender risk analysis.

[1] IASC – Inter Agency Standing Committee

 

KEY DELIVERABLES

Expected Outputs:

  1. Inception Report: The qualifying consultant is expected to submit a detailed plan of how the analysis will be carried out including the assessment protocol. The plan will outline the tools and detailed work plan for the entire exercise.
  2. Draft Final Report: A draft final report presenting the key findings of the analysis and conclusions and recommendations including an Executive Summary not exceeding 4 pages.
  3. A PowerPoint presentation presenting methodology, findings and recommendations of the assessment (audience and location to be determined) for discussion and agreement on adjustments to the report.
  4. The final report, incorporation of feedback from the presentation into the draft report as well as a round to incorporating feedback from the donor should they not be present in the presentation. The final report should clearly describe the main barriers and provision of realistic recommendations on how to over them with in the humanitarian programme context and suggestions for baseline indicators and gender responsive indicators and targets.

All excel hosted data in English and disaggregated by sex and, where appropriate, by age

 

Duration and Work Schedule:

Activity

Estimated time (No. of days)

Initial consultation between Gender Technical Team Members to agree on the assignment and development of detailed workplan

2

Inception Report: The qualifying consultant is expected to submit a detailed plan of how the analysis will be carried out including the assessment protocol. The plan will outline the tools and detailed work plan for the entire exercise.

5

Primary data collection utilizing Focus Group Discussions (FGDs), key informant interviews and quantitative surveys. Tools should include (i) A quantitative (closed-ended) questionnaire for the survey component of the intersectional Gender Analysis; and most importantly (ii) Separate qualitative (open-ended) guides for key Informant Interview and Focus group discussion in order to best capture the nuances of the above mentioned variables, in a specific context across the three states

15

Draft Final Report: A draft final report presenting the key findings of the analysis and conclusions and recommendations including an Executive Summary not exceeding 4 pages.

10

Preparation and PowerPoint presentation presenting methodology, findings and recommendations of the assessment (audience and location to be determined) for discussion and agreement on adjustments to the report.

3

The final report, incorporation of feedback from the presentation into the draft report as well as a round to incorporating feedback from the donor should they not be present in the presentation. The final report should clearly describe the main barriers and provision of realistic recommendations on how to over them with in the humanitarian programme context and suggestions for baseline indicators and gender responsive indicators and targets.

10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Key perfomance indicators

  • Inception Report
  • Analysis of secondary data
  • Research methodology; mapping tools (examples: matrix with key questions and means of verification, questionnaires, interview protocols, meeting programmes, focus group methodologies, etc.);
  • Documented records of interviews and observations with key stakeholders.
  • Presentation of findings to key stakeholders, including local women-led organizations, international humanitarian actors, including UN agencies and INGOs, national government counterparts and local authorities;
  • Draft report delivered to UN Women for consideration and comments/substantive inputs;
  • Final report submitted following UN Women’s review and comments.
  • Enhanced understanding of the UN Women mandates in relation to advancing gender equality
  • Sound experience in the use of feminist, participatory and empowering research methods.
  • The selected consultant(s) will complete the mandatory PSEA training and sign documentation committing to adherence to protection of participants, IDPs, returnees and Host community members and staff that the consultants will engage with.


Competencies

 

CORE VALUES AND GUIDING PRINCIPLES:

  • Integrity:

Demonstrate consistency in upholding and promoting the values of UN Women in actions and decisions, in line with the UN Code of Conduct.

  • Professionalism:

Demonstrate professional competence and expert knowledge of the pertinent substantive areas of work.

  • Cultural sensitivity and valuing diversity:

Demonstrate an appreciation of the multicultural nature of the organization and the diversity of its staff. Demonstrate an international outlook, appreciating difference in values and learning from cultural diversity.

 

CORE COMPETENCIES:

  • Awareness and Sensitivity Regarding Gender Issues
  • Accountability and Responsibility
  • Creative Problem Solving
  • Effective Communication
  • Inclusive Collaboration
  • Stakeholder Engagement
  • Leading by Example

 

FUNCTIONAL COMPETENCIES:

  • Excellent knowledge of contextual gender equality literature, women’s rights, empowerment and participation in leadership and decision making
  • Knowledge of the North East Nigeria humanitarian crisis, its gendered impacts and gender transformation opportunities
  • Excellent research and analytical skills
  • Excellent networking and communication skills
  • Excellent writing  and presentation skills
  • Excellent analytical and problem-solving skills 
  • Full compliance with UN Women’s regulations and operating procedures
  • Ability to plan work assignments and to establish priorities 
  • Ability to break down complex information and simplify to facilitate understanding by persons with limited literacy
  • Negotiation skills and ability to work at all levels with others to reach mutually benefiting and lasting understandings 
  • Promotes a knowledge sharing and learning culture.
  • Excellent interpersonal skills; capacity to recognize and respond appropriately to the ideas, interests and concerns of others;
  • Ability to establish and maintain effective working relations with people in a multi-cultural, multi-ethnic environment with sensitivity and respect for diversity
  • Extensive experience in developing and finalizing technical documents/reports


Required Skills and Experience

Education and certification:

The consultant should have a post-graduate degree in Gender Equality/Development studies/ (or other similar relevant field).

Experience:

  • At least 5 years’ consultancy experience in the field of Gender Equality Programming. Data gathering, analysis, and writing up of assessment reports experience is key for this piece of work
  • Extensive Proven expertise in research, gender analysis, gendr action plan development and gender mainstreaming into policies,strategies, programs and projects
  • Proven consultancy experience in the field of Gender Equality Programming. Data gathering, analysis, and writing up of assessment reports experience is key for this piece of work
  • Experience in humanitarian and development programmes across the sectors with a focus on gender equality/ GBV, Livelihoods in emergency and development settings.
  • Experience in working with UN system, International Orgnaization conducting gender analysis, establishing relationships among international organizations and national governments in the field of gender and human rights of women
  • Relevant knowledge humanitarian inter agency sectors, of gender transformative project design with substantial experience in design, monitoring and evaluation of gender projects
  • Extensive experience in developing and finalizing technical documents/ reports
  • Working experience with the UN system is desirable;

Language Requirements:

  • Excellent written and verbal communication skills in English. Knowledge of Hausa is desired.



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