National Consultant for Evaluation of the National Action Plan on UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security (2016 - 2020)



Advertised on behalf of :

Location : Dili, Timor Leste
Application Deadline :17-Aug-20 (Midnight New York, USA)
Additional Category :Gender Equality
Type of Contract :Individual Contract
Post Level :National Consultant
Languages Required :
English  
Starting Date :
(date when the selected candidate is expected to start)
24-Aug-2020
Duration of Initial Contract :3 months
Expected Duration of Assignment :3 months

Background

The National Action Plan for the implementation of UNSCR 1325 (NAP 1325) on Women, Peace and Security in Timor-Leste was officially adopted by the Council of Minister on April 2016. The NAP 1325 was the result of a participatory multi-stakeholder process initiated in 2013 with a series of learning and consultation events to mobilize the support and involvement of key stakeholders. The NAP 1325 shows the commitment of the Government to implement the UNSCR 1325, in addition to the CEDAW Convention and Beijing Platform for Action. It is organized around four pillars (Participation, Prevention, Protection and Peacebuilding) with 12 Government institutions involved in its implementation, as well as civil society organizations as part of its Governance and monitoring structure.

This NAP 1325 was developed based on the lessons and experiences of women during Timor-Leste’s struggle for independence. The NAP on UNSCR 1325 (2016-2020) re-affirms that although the period of conflict is over, Timorese women continue to struggle to achieve justice and equal rights today. As a policy document, the NAP has supported implementation of the recommendations of the Chega! report[1] and contributes to the country’s efforts to achieve the Sustainable Development Goals, particularly Goals 5 on Gender Equality and 16 on Peaceful and Just Institutions. The NAP 1325 aims to compensate and recognise women’s suffering as victims during the past conflict, as well as recognises women’s contributions during the liberation struggle and in the state-building process. Women have played key roles in support of the resistance, but as with many post-conflict countries, faced pressure to remain in domestic care-giving roles once the peace and development process started. The NAP 1325 has served as an important impetus to increase and strengthen the active participation and leadership of Timorese women in the peace- and state building efforts of this nation.

The NAP 1325 has four main objectives aligned to the four pillars under the Women, Peace and Security Agenda:

  • To promote and increase women’s participation in all decision-making fora, including in the defense and security sector
  • Prevention of gender-based violence, including sexual violence through incorporating women’s perspectives into early warning systems, public education, and the prosecution of violators of women’s rights.
  • Protection of women from all forms of gender-based violence during and after conflict,
  • Promoting the role of women in peacebuilding and conflict resolution and ensuring the participation of women in all areas of planning and development, including as part of economic growth and through gender responsive budgeting.

 

In support of the NAP 1325’s implementation, UN Women in Timor-Leste has rolled-out the project “Enhancing Women’s Meaningful Leadership and Participation in State Building and Development in Timor-Leste” from June 2016 until the present (hereby called the Women, Peace and Security Project). Generously funded by the Government of Japan, the project’s overall development goal is to ensure that ‘Peace and security and humanitarian action’ are shaped by women’s leadership and participation’. The Women, Peace and Security (WPS) project is focused on strengthening implementation and capacity of the four pillars of the WPS Agenda, with specific attention to Participation (Pillar I) and Prevention (Pillar II). More specifically, it works jointly with the Ministry of Interior to implement the NAP 1325 and to enhance the leadership and decision-making capacities of diverse groups of women (including youth and women and girls with disabilities) toward more gender-responsive conflict prevention and peacebuilding processes.  

UN Women Timor-Leste has been working closely with the Ministry of Interior, especially the National Directorate of Community Conflict Prevention (DNPCC), to provide technical and financial support the implementation structure of the NAP 1325 as well as capacity development of the structure's members on NAP 1325.  UN Women has also been supporting selected partners under the NAP 1325 to implement their obligations under the NAP 1325. More specifically, UN Women has provided support to DNPCC with rolling out a gender responsive approach to conflict prevention and resolution (mediation), as well as the PNTL to support increase women's participation in the security forces. UN Women has also partnered with three civil society organizations: Asosiasaun Chega ba Ita, Belun and Ba Futuru. 


The NAP 1325 is in its final year of implementation, and the Government of Timor-Leste is planning an evaluation. This evaluation coincides with the UN Women WPS end-of-project evaluation. The Ministry of Interior, as the coordinator of the NAP 1325, and UN Women TL will work jointly to conduct the final evaluation of the NAP 1325 (2016-2020). The NAP 1325 evaluation will review progress to achieving the results of the NAP, more specifically the contributions of UN Women and the Ministry of Interior, and inform the preparatory work for the development of the second phase to the NAP 1325.

 

Guiding documents for evaluation at UN Women, are the following: Evaluation Policy, Evaluation Chapter of the POM, the GERAAS evaluation report quality checklist, the United Nations System-wide Action Plan Evaluation Performance Indicator (UN-SWAP EPI) and the UN Women Evaluation Handbook. These documents serve as the frame of reference for the Evaluation for ensuring compliance with the various requirements and assuring the quality of the evaluation report.

 

[1] [1] Chega is Portuguese for ‘no more, stop, enough’. It was chosen as the title of the official report of Timor-Leste’s truth and reconciliation commission, the Comissao de Acolhimento, Verdade e Reconciliacao (CAVR). The CAVR was an independent, Timorese institution working between 2002 and 2005, whose mandate was to establish the truth about human rights violations between 25 April 1974 and 25 October 1999, to facilitate community reconciliation, and to write a report with findings and recommendations


Duties and Responsibilities

Based on the specific context analysis for Timor-Leste and with the strong support and commitment of all stakeholders, a series of specific objectives were formulated for the NAP 1325 for Timor-Leste, organized around the four pillars - or four P’s – of Participation, Prevention, Protection and Peacebuilding2.

 

The Participation Pillar

Participation means women’s significant involvement in all aspects and at all levels of decision- making in public and private life. Equal participation of women in all decision-making processes is about increasing the number of women representatives in decision-making processes and ensuring that women can actively and meaningfully participate in decision-making. Meaningful participation means that women represent their own interests and needs, have a voice that is heard and responded to by duty bearers, and hold duty bearers to account on their promises.

 

Participation Objectives of the NAP-WPS 2016-2020

To promote and increase women’s participation in all decision-making fora, including in the defense and security sector, the Timor-Leste National Action Plan on Women Peace and Security (2016-2020) defined the following aims:

  • Increased representation of women elected or appointed to roles in decision-making positions in the security and justice sectors at local and national levels.
  • Laws, Policies and Programs regarding peace and security are developed with maximum participation from various groups of women and men, and promote gender equality.
  • Increased promotion, recruitment and representation of women in national institutions for security, defense and justice
  • Community conflict resolution mechanisms and leaders provide opportunities for women to participate actively as mediators and focal points in peace and security.

 

The Prevention Pillar

Prevention of gender- based violence, including sexual violence, must be prioritised for sustaining peace. Prevention can be achieved through incorporating women’s perspectives into early warning systems, public education, and the prosecution of violators of women’s rights.

 

Prevention Objectives of the NAP-WPS 2016-2020

To help prevent all kinds of violent conflicts and other forms of violence, the National Action Plan commits to:

  • Integrate modules on gender in training manuals of defense, security and justice training institutions and provide mandatory courses on gender equality, human rights and HIV/AIDS awareness.-
  • Include a gender perspective in conflict prevention mechanisms.
  • Promote a culture of peaceful conflict resolution in the community.
  • Ensure that laws and policies that guide conflict resolution and mediation are gender-sensitive.
  • Strengthen (public) awareness on gender-sensitive conflict prevention through media

 

The Protection Pillar

Protection of women and girls covers all forms of gender-based violence: physical, sexual, psychological, and economic, including experiences from the conflict and present period, in the home and in the community. Women and girls have a basic human right to live free from violence Protection guarantees women and girl’s safety, physical and mental health and economic security, and ensures that their human rights are respected.

 

Protection Objectives of the NAP-WPS 2016-2020[1]

To ensure women’s protection from all forms of gender-based violence during and after conflict, the Timor-Leste National Action Plan on Women Peace and Security (2016-2020) defined the following aims:

  • Improve the gender sensitivity of the formal justice system through the implementation of gender-sensitive laws and the equal and gender-sensitive interpretation of laws and regulations.
  • Expand awareness and accessibility of voluntary counselling and testing for HIV/AIDS and STI’s in municipalities.

 

The Peace Building Pillar

Peacebuilding can only be sustained in an environment that promotes inclusion and equality. It is about promoting the role of women in peacebuilding and conflict resolution and ensuring the participation of women in all areas of planning and development, including as part of economic growth and through gender responsive budgeting.

Peacebuilding objectives of the NAP-WPS (2016-2020)

To ensure the participation of women in peace-building and all areas of post-conflict planning, economic reconstruction and development, the National Action Plan commits to:

  • Ensure women have access to natural resources - including land, clean water and other basic needs - to allow them to build sustainable livelihoods and contribute to a stable and peaceful society.
  • Promote women’s roles in peace-building and conflict resolution at the community level.
  • Implements the government recommendations and provisions of the Timor-Leste CAVR and CVA regarding women’s rights.
  • Former women combatants and veterans receive justice and recognition for their contributions to peace.

 

Coordination and implementation Structure

The Ministry of Interior (MOI), as lead coordinator of the NAP 1325, established a NAP 1325 implementation structure. The Structure comprises a Steering Committee (SC), four working groups (one per pillar), the M&E group and a Secretariat to support coordinated implementation of the Plan, staffed by MOI civil servants. In addition, 27 focal points (17 women and 10 men) have been appointed from the 12 Government institutions and 10 CSOs responsible for implementation of the 47 activities under the NAP 1325.

 

The NAP 1325 involves 12 Government Institutions (Ministry of Interior, Ministry of Justice, Ministry of Social Solidarity and Inclusion, Ministry of Defense, Secretary of State for Equality and Inclusion, Secretary of State for Youth and Sports, National Police of Timor-Leste; Falantil – Defence Forces from Timor-Leste, Prime Minister’s Office, Ministry of Foreign Affairs, Ministry of Education, The Ombudsman for Human Rights and Justice (Ombudsperson), and the Women’s Parliamentarian Caucus. It also involves more than 10 key civil society organizations APSCTL, Belun, Ba Futuru, Fokupers, Fundação Patria, Fundação Alola, Fundação Caucus, Acbit, Alfela, Empreza Diak, JSMP, Luta Hamutuk, Pradet, Rede Feto, Timor Aid. 

 

Through its partnership with the Ministry of Interior National Directorate of Community Conflict Prevention (DNPCC), UN Women Timor-Leste Country Office has provided technical and financial support to strengthen the Ministry of Interior's capacity to coordinate and strengthen the NAP 1325 implementation structure. UN Women has also been supporting selected stakeholders under the NAP 1325 to strengthen their technical capacity on WPS, as identified above.

 

III. Purpose (and use of the evaluation)

The NAP 1325 is in its final year of implementation and UN Women WPS work is also at the end of the project. The main purpose of the evaluation is to inform decision-making regarding the development of the next NAP 1325 or other policies and plans on Women, Peace and Security, lessons learned will feed into strengthening the country’s work in empowering of women and realizing gender equality under the pillars of the NAP 1325 (see below table).
 

Primary

Intended Users

Primary Intended Use

Learning & Knowledge Generation

Strategic Decision-Making

Accountability

Capacity Development & Mobilisation

The Ministry of Interior  (MOI)

X

X

X

X

UN Women Timor Leste

X

X

X

X

UN sister agencies  

X

 

X

 

Primary Target groups (individuals, communities, programme / project partners)

  

X

X

Other Ministries Implementing the NAP

X

X

X

X

Civil Society Representatives

X

 

X

X

Multilateral Partners (including donors)

X

 

X

 

 

IV. Objectives

The specific objectives of the evaluation include:

  • Assess the relevance of the NAP 1325 and specifically UN Women and Ministry of Interiors support given the context and evolving national priorities.  
  • Assess the effectiveness and efficiency of UN Women and Ministry of Interior support to the design, coordination mechanisms, and implementation of the NAP 1325 in Timor Leste, and identify the results for women and girls from across the 4 pillars for WPS and  remaining challenges;
  • Assess the coherence of UN Women’s work in support of NAP 1325 vis a vis the UN system and other actors.
  • Assess the extent to which UN Women and Ministry of Interior’s approach was human rights focused and gender responsive.
  • Document lessons learned, good practices and challenges to inform future work in addressing women`s needs in Timor-Leste related to the 4 pillars for WPS
  • Provide actionable recommendations aimed at strengthening UN Women support to Timor Leste for future NAP 1325 or other possible WPS or GEEW related frameworks

 

V. Scope of the evaluation

The evaluation will cover almost the full NAP 1325 timeframe and the UN Women project from the adoption of the NAP 1325 in April 2016 through June 2020, although both the NAP framework implementation and WPS project ends in December 2020.

 

The evaluation will focus on the coordination, implementation and monitoring mechanism of the NAP 1325, more specifically, the implementation structure.  The geographical scope for the evaluation includes the implementation of the NAP 1325 in Timor-Leste at the national level in Dili, as well as with a particular focus on two pilot municipalities of Covalima and Baucau and the Special Administrative Region of Oecusse-Ambeno.

 

The evaluation will also identify results under the four pillars in the NAP 1325 (see section below on limitation):

  • Pillar I Participation: To promote and increase women’s participation in all decision-making fora, including in the defense and security sector,
  • Pillar II Prevention: To help prevent all kinds of violent conflicts and other forms of violence
  • Pillar III Protection: To ensure women’s protection from all forms of gender-based violence during and after conflict
  • Pillar IV Peacebuilding: To ensure the participation of women in peace-building and all areas of post-conflict planning, economic reconstruction and development,

 

Limitations

The NAP 1325 is inherently broad, and thus, although the evaluation will attempt to cover the results under the 4 pillars, it may be necessary to narrow the scope and take a more focused look on two of the pillars in order to ensure robust evidence. Given that there is a limited baseline information and monitoring/reporting data available, during the inception phase, the evaluation team will do a rapid evaluability assessment to determine where the most robust information is and whether a narrowed scope or case study approach will be necessary. The evaluation will include national evaluators to ensure the local context and cultural nuances are fully understood by the evaluation team. The evaluation will also be, as much as possible, participatory to ensure that gaps in information or misinterpretation are identified. The triangulation of data will ensure that findings are based on multiple sources and multiple methods to provide confidence in the evaluation findings. 

 

The COVID-19 Pandemic has created an unprecedented situation which might affect the ability to travel locally. It also puts constrains on organizing meetings and workshops, limiting the possibility for ensuring a fully participatory process. The scope of the evaluation will be reviewed based on the situation and the possibility for the evaluation team to travel, and might need to be limited to Dili in case of renewed travel limitations. Part of the meetings and interviews will be organized through Zoom, WhatsApp or other online meeting modalities, and focus group discussions will be organized by the national consultants. The international team leader might not be able to travel to Dili and will then be coaching the evaluation team remotely, in close collaboration with the national consultant based in Dili.

 

VI. Evaluation design (process and methods)

 

The evaluation will be a transparent and, as much as possible, participatory process involving relevant stakeholders and partners involved in the implementation of the NAP 1325. The evaluation will follow gender equality and human rights principles, as defined in the UN Women Evaluation Policy[2] and adhere to the United Nations norms and standards for evaluation in the United Nations system[3].The evaluation will apply a gender-responsive approach which will  promote inclusion and participation with a focus on utilization[4], empowerment[5] or feminist approaches[6]. Gender-responsive evaluation applies mixed-methods (quantitative and qualitative data collection methods and analytical approaches) to account for complexity of gender relations and to ensure participatory and inclusive processes that are culturally appropriate.

The evaluation will be primarily summative, with a look backwards to the results achieved mainly through UN Women and the Ministry of Interior's In contribution to the planned NAP 1325 framework, and it will also have a forward-looking perspective with respect to future work on WPS in Timor-Leste given the current context of the country. As noted under the scope section, during the inception phase, the evaluation team will need to undertake a rapid evaluability assessment to assess the availability and quality of data for assessing contributions to change. The evaluation team may need to narrow the scope or take a case-study approach to assess contributions in greater depth in two of the four pillars of the NAP1325. An adapted outcome mapping/harvesting approach[7] is suggested for the in-country visit. It should identify expected and unexpected changes in target and affected groups.

The data collection methods should include desk review, in-depth interviews with key stakeholders, such as the NAP 1325 Steering Committee, and working group members and other key government institutions mandated to implement activities under one or more of the NAP 1325 pillars, and women`s CSOs specialized in one or more areas of NAP WPS or addressing the needs and representing the interests of specific groups of women, such as rural women, women with disabilities, etc. The evaluation will also assess through focus group discussions the change made at community level with rights holders from the activities implemented by NAP 1325 partners. Most significant change[8] (through storytelling) could be an appropriate way to engage rights holders in discussing the results from NAP 1325 related activities. Two surveys may be useful – one with the ministries and other partners involved in implementing the NAP 1325 and one at the municipal or community level to gather more detailed information on what this has meant beyond the capital. A more detailed evaluation methodology will be proposed and agreed with the evaluation team and will be presented in the evaluation inception report. All data collection tools will be approved as part of the inception report in advance of field visits. 

 

The evaluation team should develop a sampling frame (area and population represented, rationale for selection, mechanism of selection, limitations of the sample) and specify how it will address the diversity of stakeholders in the intervention. The evaluation team should take measures to ensure data quality, reliability and validity of data collection tools and methods and their responsiveness to gender equality and human rights; for example, the limitations of the sample (representativeness) should be stated clearly and the data should be triangulated (cross-checked against other sources) to help ensure robust results.

The evaluation will apply the following evaluation criteria relevance, effectiveness, efficiency, human rights and gender equality and sustainability and address the following key questions[9], which will be further refined in consultation with the Management and Reference groups and the evaluation team:

Relevance:

  • To what extent does UN Women's work in support of Timor-Leste's NAP 1325 and its 4 pillars (participation, prevention, protection, peacebuilding) address the priority needs of women and girls In Timor-Leste in order to realize their rights?

 

Effectiveness:

  • To what extent has UN Women and the Ministry of Interior  effectively supported Timor-Leste to coordinate and implement the NAP 1325 to achieve its outputs and contribute towards the achievement of its objectives across the 4 pillars (participation, prevention, protection, peacebuilding), including contributions to the Sustainable Development Goals? How has the NAP 1325 brought change and results for women and girls across Timor-Leste?
  • To what extent have effective partnerships been forged to facilitate contributions towards the objectives?

 

Efficiency and Coherence:

  • To what extent has UN Women contributed to clarity in roles and responsibilities that have contributed to an efficient implementation and monitoring of the NAP 1325?
  • Has the coordination, both horizontal and vertical among agencies involved contributed to the coherence of the implementation and monitoring of the NAP 1325, ensuring synergies and not duplication?
  • To what extent has UN Women supported Timor-Leste to allocate adequate resources (financial, human, technical support, etc.) and use resources in a cost-effective way to achieve the NAP 1325 results?

 

Sustainability:

  • To what extent has UN Women contributed to the NAP 1325 being nationally owned and driven as demonstrated through institutionalization, allocation of adequate budget, and establishment of accountability and oversight mechanisms?
  • Do national/local institutions demonstrate leadership, commitment and technical capacity to continue working on the implementation of women, peace and security agenda?

Human Rights and Gender Equality

  • To what extent did UN Women include relevant national stakeholders and actors in the NAP 1325 implementation and policy advocacy processes? Do key national partners, including women’s movements and women’s organizations etc., have voice and influence in the implementation of NAP 1325?
  • To what extent did the NAP 1325 succeed in building individual and institutional capacities of rights-holders and duty-bearers? To what extent has the approach been inclusive, targeting and tailoring to the needs of marginalized groups, including persons with disabilities, survivors of past conflict, veterans, members of the LGBTI community, and stakeholders living in rural and isolated areas. 

 

Process

The evaluation will be divided into five phases:

  1. Preparation, mainly devoted to structuring the evaluation approach, preparing the TOR, compiling programme documentation, and hiring the evaluation consultant;
  2. Inception, which will involve rapid evaluability assessment, reconstruction of theory of change, desk review, meeting with EMG and ERG, development and validation of inception report and finalization of evaluation methodology;
  3. Data collection and analysis, including in-depth desk research and preparation of field missions, visits to selected sites (dependent upon COVID-19 situation);
  4. Data analysis and reporting stage, focusing on data analyzed, interpretation of findings and drafting and validation of an evaluation report including presentation to EMG and ERG; and
  5. Dissemination, follow-up and use, which will entail the development of a Management Response by the different relevant parties.             

 

The outline above corresponds to the entire evaluation process from preparation, to conduct, reporting and follow up and use. The evaluation team will only be responsible for the inception, data collection and data analysis and reporting phase.

 

 

VII. Stakeholder participation

 

The evaluation of the NAP 1325 will be conducted externally by independent evaluation consultants, under leadership of an International team leader who will help identify and work with a team including a national consultant, with the support of the above described EMG composed by representatives of the Ministry of Interior, and UN Women in Timor-Leste and the UN Women Regional Evaluation Specialist[10].

 

Key stakeholders involved in the implementation of the NAP 1325 are:

  • The Ministry of Interior is responsible for the overall leadership and implementation of the Timor-Leste NAP on UNSCR 1325 (2016-2020). Especially the National Directorate for Community Conflict Prevention (DNPCC) plays a de-facto a key role in the implementation of the strategy, and were the leading unit in ensuring the NAP 1325 was developed and approved.
  • The Ministry of Social Solidarity and Inclusion (MSSI), Ministry of Justice (MoJ), Ministry of Defense (MoD) and the Secretary of State for Equality and Inclusion (SEII) and related institutions (such as the National Police, Defense Forces, Ombudspersons Office, among others) are responsible for implementation of separate activities stipulated under each of the four pillars in their respected area of work.
  • The Steering Committee for implementation of the NAP UNSCR1325 consists of Director General staff of the involved Ministries and of the Executive Directors of involved civil society organizations[11]. The Steering Committee:
    • Provides approvals and reviews of the NAP UNSCR 1325
    • Develops and submit funding proposals to donors in case of insufficient national funding
    • Acts as ambassadors and advocates of the NAP UNSCR 1325

 

The Unit of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation of the Prime Minister's office is the Government entity responsible for planning, monitoring and evaluation of Government programmes. They include Gender-Responsive Budgeting into their planning and budgeting systems, and have integrated the NAP 1325 into the on-line programme budgeting structure.

 

 

IX. Duties and Responsibilities

 

The national consultant with the overall guidance of the Head of Office, will work under the direct supervision of the International Consultant (team leader of the evaluation assignment). She or he is expected to have deep knowledge of national, development and gender context in Timor-Leste. The national consultant will be providing support to the international consultant in the process of the evaluation in Timor-Leste, and will be responsible for the following tasks:

  • To collect and review all relevant data and materials, such as reports, assessment, studies, and other relevant information, and to make the data and materials accessible to the international consultant;
  • To support in country consultations, and travel to other municipalities may be required;
  • To provide in depth analysis and key inputs in national, development and gender situation in the country;
  • To support arrangement of meetings, interviews, workshops, focus group discussions with stakeholders of the NAP 1325 implementation;
  • To participate in all the meetings, interviews, workshops and focus group discussions, and provide interpretation as needed, take notes and prepare minutes in English, and to support the international consultant to remotely participate in these meetings if possible. To communicate the preparation and follow-up with the international consultant;
  • To organize inception workshop for in country pre- data collection. It will be a participatory workshop in Dili with stakeholders to discuss the overall approach of the evaluation and elaborate the reconstructed theory of change. Prior to the workshop, the overview of the approach and preliminary theory of change should be shared with evaluation manager;
  • To organize data collection visit, including debriefing PPT with the EMG. Depending on the situation, the team leader might support national consultants to perform the data collection from a distance;
  • To prepare jointly with the international consultant a participatory workshop to present preliminary findings (using Power Point and participatory methods) highlighting key evaluation findings and conclusions, lessons learnt and initial thoughts on way forward. A first draft PPT and workshop agenda/approach will be shared with UN Women prior to presenting externally with minimum 1 round of revision. Any final data collection needed will also be undertaken;
  • Depending on the COVID-19 situation, a part of the meetings and interviews will be organized through Zoom, WhatsApp or other online meeting modalities, and in-country focus group discussions will be organized by the national consultants. The international team leader might not be able to travel to Dili and will be coaching the evaluation team remotely, in close collaboration with the national consultant based in Dili;
  • To support the drafting and finalization process for the evaluation and provide inputs to the evaluation reports as needed;
  • To provide relevant inputs for the presentation and completion of the following deliverables.

 

Expected deliverables

 

No

Deliverable

Date of reporting/

submission

1

A report on the support provided to team leader (International Consultant) in drafting Inception Report and developing Evaluation Matrix, including drafting data collection tools which will outline refined evaluation objectives and scope; rapid evaluability assessment; description of refined evaluation methodology/ methodological approach, data analysis methods to be deployed, key informants to be consulted, plan for ethical conduct; and work plan.

30 September 2020

2

A report on the support provided to the team leader (International Consultant) in the process of evaluation of NAP 1325, including but not limited to supporting in country data collection, organizing meetings and workshops (inception workshop for in-country pre-data collection, data collection visit, participatory workshop for presenting preliminary findings, etc), as well as reports drafting.

All data collection tools and analysis matrices, key information, documents and data collected, minutes of meetings, interviews and focus group discussion and context analysis provided to team leader (International Consultant) should be attached in the annex.

30 November 2020

 

 

 

X. Management of evaluation

 

The evaluation will be a consultative, inclusive and participatory process and will ensure the participation of women CSOs representing various groups of women from various municipalities in Timor-Leste. Special attention will be given to representativeness of all target groups of women, including rural women, women with a disability, older women, women survivors of past conflict, young women.

Evaluation Management Group

An Evaluation Management Group (EMG) will be confirmed and will be the main decision-making body for the evaluation. It will consist of the Ministry of Interior, UN Women Evaluation Manager, the Coordination/M&E Officer, UN Women Head of Office, and UN Women Regional Evaluation Specialist (who is part of the Independent Evaluation Service). The EMG will be responsible for the overall management of the evaluation and will oversee the day to day business of the evaluation and communication with the Evaluation Team. UN Women Head of Office, and WPS Consultant, in close coordination with the Regional Evaluation Specialist will be responsible for day-to-day management of the evaluation and the coordination for the field visits, including logistical support.

 

Evaluation Reference Group

An Evaluation Reference Group (ERG) will be established to ensure that the evaluation approach is relevant to stakeholders, and to make certain that factual errors or errors of omission or interpretation are identified in evaluation products. The reference group will provide input at key stages of the evaluation: inception workshop, inception report; draft and final reports. The ERG will be consulted on key aspects of the evaluation process. It will be composed of designated representatives from the Ministry of Interior, Unit of Planning, Monitoring and Evaluation (of the Prime Minister's office), PNTL, FFDTL, Secretary of State for Equality and Inclusion, Rede Feto, civil society representatives a UN sister agency and UN Women Timor-Leste and the Regional Evaluation Specialist. The group will be composed to ensure that all relevant stakeholders groups and perspectives are represented, including from CSOs representing rights holders.

 

XI. Duration of the assignment  

The total duration of the contract assignment will be around 3 months (August – November 2020).

 

XII. Inputs  

 

Responsibility of the consultant:

  • Consultant will cover cost of communication and all administrative related cost to complete the deliverables.

 

Responsibility of UN Women:

  • UN Women will provide office space, printing facilities, internet in Dili.
  • UN Women will provide reference materials when needed.
  • UN Women will cover cost of the inception workshop and validation workshop, including venue, simultaneous translation, printing of workshop material, refreshments, per diem of participants.
  • UN Women will provide local transportation to the municipalities and the cost of travelling to the municipalities, including transportation and daily subsistence allowance (DSA) will be covered by UN Women.

 

[1] The National Action Plan on Gender-Based Violence 2017-2022 offers a separate guidance for the Government on addressing Gender-Based Violence in Timor-Leste. The plan is not part of this evaluation, however, the evaluation will assess how GBV has been mainstreamed into NAP 1325 activity implementation.

[2] UN Women, Evaluation policy of the United Nations Entity for Gender Equality and the Empowerment of Women (UNW/2012/12), http://www.unwomen.org/en/digital-library/publications/2012/10/evaluation-policy-of-the-united-nations-entity-for-gender-equality-and-the-empowerment-of-women  

[3] United Nations Evaluation Group, Norms and Standards for evaluation in the United Nations system, access at: http://www.uneval.org/document/detail/1914

[4] Promotes intended use by intended users. Strong focus on participation of users throughout the evaluation process.

[5] Programme participants are involved in the conduct of the evaluation. An outside evaluator serves as a coach or facilitator in the evaluation process.

[6] Addresses and examines opportunities to reverse gender inequities that lead to social injustice. Prioritizes women’s experience and voices, including women from discriminated and marginalized groups.

[7] Earl, S., Carden, F., and T. Smutylo. 2001. “Outcome Mapping, Building Learning and Reflection into Development Programs”. IDRC 2001. See also: www.outcomemapping.ca.  

[8] Most significant change is a participatory method used to engage rights holders in discussing how the intervention has affected their lives: https://www.betterevaluation.org/en/plan/approach/most_significant_change

[9] The final evaluation matrix will be included and validated in the evaluation inception report. 

[10] The Regional Evaluation Specialist is part of the UN Women Independent Evaluation and Audit Services and based in Bangkok.

[11] NGO members include: Rede Feto, Asosiasaun Chega ba Ita (Acbit), APSCTL, Belun, Fokupers, Justice System Monitoring Programme (JSMP), Ba Futuru, Alola Foundation, Caucus.


Competencies

Competencies

Core Values:

  • Respect for Diversity
  • Integrity
  • Professionalism

Core Competencies:

  • Awareness and Sensitivity Regarding Gender Issues
  • Accountability
  • Creative Problem Solving
  • Effective Communication
  • Inclusive Collaboration
  • Stakeholder Engagement
  • Leading by Example

Please visit this link for more information on UN Women’s Core Values and Competencies


Required Skills and Experience

Consultant’s performance will be evaluated based on: professionalism, timeliness, responsibility, initiative, communication, accuracy, and quality of the products delivered according to UN Women GERAAS quality standards

 

XIV. Required experience and qualifications  

 

The national consultant will support the team leader and all other team members during all phases of the evaluation process, including but not limited to in country data collection and consultation, and will be responsible for the evaluation deliverables, ensuring the quality of deliverables and application of methodology as well as timely delivery of all products.

Education 

- Master's degree or Bachelor’s degree equivalent in social sciences, including gender studies, international affairs, sociology, public policy, political science, public administration, economics, or other relevant fields.

Experience: 

- At least Master degree with 1 year or Bachelor degree with 4 years of experience in conducting evaluations of strategies, policies and programmes;

 

- Experience and knowledge on women, peace and security, gender mainstreaming, gender analysis;

- Excellent analytical, facilitation and communications skills and ability to negotiate amongst a wide range of stakeholders;

- Knowledge of human rights issues, the human rights-based approach to programming, human rights analysis and related mandates within the UN system;

 

 Language and other skills: 

- Proficiency in written and spoken English language;

- Knowledge of Tetum or Bahasa Indonesia will be considered an asset.

 

XV. Ethical code of conduct

 

In addition to abiding by the  UN Women Evaluation Consultants Agreement Form, UNEG Ethical Guidelines and Code of Conduct for Evaluation in the UN system , the evaluation team will need to outline their approach to ensuring accountability to populations and ethical approaches In the evaluation process. This should be a dedicated section in the Inception report.

All data collected by the team members must be submitted to the evaluation manager in Word, PowerPoint or Excel formats and is the property of Government of Timor-Leste and UN Women.  Proper storage of data is essential for ensuring confidentiality. The UNEG guidelines note the importance of ethical conduct for the following reasons:

  1. Responsible use of power: All those engaged in evaluation processes are responsible for upholding the proper conduct of the evaluation.
  2. Ensuring credibility: With a fair, impartial and complete assessment, stake- holders are more likely to have faith in the results of an evaluation and to take note of the recommendations.
  3. Responsible use of resources: Ethical conduct in evaluation increases the chances of acceptance by the parties to the evaluation and therefore the likelihood that the investment in the evaluation will result in improved outcomes.

 

The evaluation’s value added is its impartial and systematic assessment of the programme or intervention. As with the other stages of the evaluation, involvement of stakeholders should not interfere with the impartiality of the evaluation.

The evaluator(s) have the final judgment on the findings, conclusions and recommendations of the evaluation report, and the evaluator(s) must be protected from pressures to change information in the report.

Proper procedures for data collection with rights holders who may have been affected by violence must be adhered to as outlined in the WHO Ethical and Safety Recommendations for research on violence against women. Additionally, if the evaluator(s) identify issues of wrongdoing, fraud or other unethical conduct, UN Women procedures must be followed and confidentiality be maintained.

The UN Women Legal Framework for Addressing Non-Compliance with UN Standards of Conduct, and accountability policies protecting against retaliation and prohibiting harassment and abuse of authority, provide a cohesive framework aimed at creating and maintaining a harmonious working environment, ensuring that staff members do not engage in any wrongdoing and that all allegations of wrongdoing are reported promptly, investigated and appropriate action taken to achieve accountability. The UN Women Legal Framework for Addressing Non-Compliance with UN Standards of Conduct defines misconduct and the mechanisms within UN Women for reporting and investigating.

ANNEXES

For more Information see the following links:

• UNEG Code of Conduct for Evaluations[1]

• UNEG Ethical Guidelines[2]

• UNEG Norms for Evaluation in the UN System[3]

• UNEG Standards for Evaluation in the UN System[4]

• UNEG Guidance Integrating Human Rights and Gender in the UN System[5]

• UN Women Evaluation Handbook[6]

• UN Women GERAAS quality criteria for evaluation reports (annexed)

• National Action Plan on UNSCR 1325 on Women, Peace and Security (2016 – 2020)[7]

 

XVI. Submission of application 

 

Interested candidates are requested to submit electronic application to UNDP Job site no later than 24 July 2020.

 

Submission of package 

  1. Cover letter and copy of the latest academic certificate;  
  1. CV, including contact information for 3 references; 
  2. Two writing samples, preferably including an evaluation.
  1. Financial proposal. The financial proposal shall specify a total lump sum amount per each deliverable, and indicating separately any travel, per diem and administrative fees, based on the template in Annex 1. The lump sum costs must be accompanied by a detailed breakdown of costs calculation. 

 

All applications must include (as an attachment) the CV and the financial proposal. Applications without financial proposal will be treated as incomplete and will not be considered for further processing.  

 

Please note that only short-listed candidates will be invited to the interview. 

 

Selected candidates will need to submit prior to commencement of work: 

  1. UN Women P-11 form, available from http://www.unwomen.org/en/about-us/employment 
  1. A statement from a medical doctor of ‘good health and fit for travel’ 
  1. The consultant will need to provide proof (certificate) of BSafe training (which can be accessed at undss.trip.org) – in case of travel

 

  1. Evaluation 

Applications will be evaluated based on the Cumulative analysis.  

  • Technical Qualification (100 points) weight; [70%]  
  • Financial Proposal (100 points) weight; [30%] 

 
A two-stage procedure is utilised in evaluating the proposals, with evaluation of the technical proposal being completed prior to any price proposal being compared. Only the price proposal of the candidates who passed the minimum technical score of 70% of the obtainable score of 100 points in the technical qualification evaluation will be evaluated. 

 

Technical qualification evaluation criteria: 

The total number of points allocated for the technical qualification component is 100. The technical qualification of the individual is evaluated based on following technical qualification evaluation criteria: 

 

Technical Evaluation Criteria 

Obtainable Score 

Education 

20 % 

Experience and skills 

70 % 

Language and other skills 

10 % 

Total Obtainable Score 

100 % 

 

Only the candidates who have attained a minimum of 70% of total points will be considered as technically-qualified candidate. 

 

 

Financial/Price Proposal evaluation: 

  • Only the financial proposal of candidates who have attained a minimum of 70% score in the technical evaluation will be considered and evaluated.  
  • The total number of points allocated for the price component is 100.  
  • The maximum number of points will be allotted to the lowest price proposal that is opened/ evaluated and compared among those technical qualified candidates who have attained a minimum of 70% score in the technical evaluation. All other price proposals will receive points in inverse proportion to the lowest price. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Annex IFinancial Proposal  

 
BREAKDOWN OF COSTS SUPPORTING THE ALL-INCLUSIVE FINANCIAL PROPOSAL 

 

Breakdown of Cost by Components: 

Deliverables 

Percentage of Total Price (Weight for payment) 

Fixed price 

 Date of Reporting/ Submission

1

A report on the support provided to team leader (International Consultant) in drafting Inception Report and developing Evaluation Matrix, including drafting data collection tools which will outline refined evaluation objectives and scope; rapid evaluability assessment; description of refined evaluation methodology/ methodological approach, data analysis methods to be deployed, key informants to be consulted, plan for ethical conduct; and work plan.

 

 

30 September 2020

2

A report on the support provided to the team leader (International Consultant) in the process of evaluation of NAP 1325, including but not limited to supporting in country data collection, organizing meetings and workshops (inception workshop for in-country pre-data collection, data collection visit, participatory workshop for presenting preliminary findings, etc), as well as reports drafting.

All data collection tools and analysis matrices, key information, documents and data collected, minutes of meetings, interviews and focus group discussion and context analysis provided to team leader (International Consultant) should be attached in the annex.

 

 

30 November 2020

 

The above lump sum costs include all administration costs and expenses related to the consultancy. All prices/rates quoted must be exclusive of all taxes. The lump sum costs must be accompanied by a detailed breakdown of costs calculation incl. travel related costs, and daily professional fee. 

 

[1] http://www.unevaluation.org/document/detail/100  

[2] http://www.unevaluation.org/document/detail/102  

[3] http://www.uneval.org/document/detail/21  

[4] http://www.uneval.org/document/detail/22

[5] http://www.uneval.org/document/detail/1616  

[6] http://genderevaluation.unwomen.org/en/evaluation-handbook  

[7] http://www.minterior.gov.tl/national-action-plan-on-united-nations-security-council-resolution-1325-2000-on-women-peace-and-security-2016-2020/?lang=en


UNDP is committed to achieving workforce diversity in terms of gender, nationality and culture. Individuals from minority groups, indigenous groups and persons with disabilities are equally encouraged to apply. All applications will be treated with the strictest confidence.

UNDP does not tolerate sexual exploitation and abuse, any kind of harassment, including sexual harassment, and discrimination. All selected candidates will, therefore, undergo rigorous reference and background checks.


If you are experiencing difficulties with online job applications, please contact erecruit.helpdesk@undp.org.

© 2016 United Nations Development Programme